The Cost of No Football

Fall without football would cost billions to colleges, NFL, TV networks, local economies

Steve Berkowitz & Tom Schad (USA Today)  —  In the world of sports, there is simply no cash cow like football.

At the professional and major college level, it is the fulcrum upon which tens of billions of dollars shift, churning out revenue for NFL owners, athletic departments, television partners, sportsbooks, and more. In some instances, the sport can serve as a seasonal engine for an entire local economy.

But what would happen to that economic machinery if football couldn’t be played in the fall?

For NFL teams and major college athletics departments, the financial implications of such a move would be staggering, far-reaching and compounded by unknowns. If COVID-19 wiped out play in the fall, could the season take place in the spring? How would a fall without football impact television partners and corporate sponsors? And how do you maintain operations when cash is only flowing out?

For Power Five athletics directors like Washington State’s Pat Chun, such questions are hardly far-fetched.

“In this COVID environment, the world seems to change every 24, 48 hours – definitely week by week,” Chun said. “There are so many hard decisions, and so many layers to every decision you make.”

While a fall without football would have multi-billion dollar impacts for the NFL, television networks and sponsors, among other entities, the potential ripple effects at the college level are more complex.

So, too, do local college towns, where multiple sectors of the economy might rely upon football Saturdays.

In a recent survey funded by the Texas A&M provost’s office and conducted by the university’s Private Enterprise Research Center and the Bryan/College Station Chamber of Commerce, for example, just over half of responding businesses said more than 20% of their current revenue is related to Texas A&M students, events or activities.

“I will tell you anecdotally that if you move football to (this) spring, while it may look the same on a one-year financial statement, there will be people not in business by spring,” Chamber president and CEO Glen Brewer said. “It will put people out of business. That is not an exaggeration. There’s no doubt about it.”

‘Everything’s on the table’

According to a USA TODAY Sports analysis of schools’ financial reports to the NCAA, the 50-plus public schools in the Power Five conferences have at least $4.1 billion in fiscal-year revenue tied to football — which is more than 60% of their athletics departments’ combined total annual operating revenues, based on amounts reported for the 2019 fiscal year.

Unlike professional franchises with mega-rich owners, college athletics departments are parts of universities that are in the midst of massive financial problems caused by the pandemic. Some athletics departments have reserve funds that can help them get by for a while. But a survey this spring by the LEAD1 Association – which represents athletic directors at the NCAA’s 130 Football Bowl Subdivision Schools – found that 54 of 95 respondents said their departments do not have such funds.

Ultimately this means that, in a fall without football, “everything’s on the table as far as expense mitigation,” according to Houston athletics director Chris Pezman.

“We want to take care of our student-athletes and support services for them from all aspects, from academics to nutrition to training to sports medicine,” he said. “But less active areas of our department would have to be looked at. More administrative and operational areas that don’t affect our student-athletes are all going to be under review.”

For some athletics departments, this could mean furloughing or laying off employees. It could mean negotiating, or extending, temporary pay reductions for well-paid coaches. And in some cases, it could mean eliminating entire sports.

If football cannot be played this fall, it is all but certain that schools would make an attempt to stage a season in the spring. But a spring season would likely create hiccups in cash flow, among other issues.

Schools would likely not play a full 12-game regular season in the spring, for a variety of reasons – which would impact payouts from TV and other commercial contracts. Games in the spring would be less valuable to advertisers, who use the third and fourth quarters of the year to build promotions and momentum for the holiday shopping season, according to AJ Maestas, the CEO of Navigate, a Chicago-based firm that specializes in college and professional sports rights valuations.

In separate interviews, Boise State AD Curt Apsey, Colorado AD Rick George and Kansas State AD Gene Taylor each cited uncertainty about football TV-revenue impacts as a major difficulty in trying to make budget decisions for fiscal 2021.

“We are so used to having that revenue kind of already in the bank,” Taylor explained.

There’s also attendance to consider.

Even in a spring scenario, stadium capacities might be heavily limited by social-distancing considerations. At present, schools are holding hundreds of millions of dollars in football season-ticket money and seating-rights payments. During the 2019 fiscal year, FBS public schools had nearly $1.1 billion in total football ticket sales, according to school financial reports.

“In our case, about 80% of our tickets have been renewed and 80% of our annual giving has already been received,” Oklahoma AD Joe Castiglione said. “The question is, what do those donors or ticket holders want in terms of their commitment in regards to those gifts or pledges?”

OU is among many schools that are, or will be, asking customers to leave their money where it is, either as credit toward next season or as an outright donation.

Meanwhile, any discussion of no college football this fall also has to include the prospect of no basketball during the fall semester – or perhaps until January. While men’s basketball does not have nearly the financial impact that football does, it is athletics departments’ other primary revenue source.

An NFL trickle-down

The NFL generates far more annual revenue than its major college counterparts, to the tune of approximately $16 billion last year, according to The Wall Street Journal.

According to Forbes, NFL teams carry valuations of $1.9 billion to $5.5 billion, and half of NFL owners have a personal net worth of $2.1 billion or more.

“The problem’s not as bad because you’ve got a lot of very wealthy owners that are sitting on assets,” Zimbalist said. “So if they can’t play football in the one fall, they lose $300 million in a year, but they’ll be able to survive.”

The math is slightly different for players, however –  many of whom navigate injuries with each season, and are unable to amass wealth over the course of a long career.

That’s one of the reasons why the NFL and the NFL Players Association already have been engaged in negotiations about a wide range of issues, from health protocols to the potential impact of a decline in revenue on future salary caps.

While their discussions have been rooted in the assumption that games will be played this season, they also could be viewed through the lens of what could happen if training camps begin but then a season does not.

“If we had our preference, we would never want the players of this year – and to a certain extent next year – (to) unfairly bear the brunt of a massive decrease in revenue in football,” NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith said in a conference call with reporters Friday.

The NFL, like other major sports, depends on television deals for a substantial chunk of its revenue. The league’s current deals with Fox, CBS, NBC and ESPN each bring in nine- or ten-figure sums annually. And those networks, in turn, depend on NFL football for a substantial portion of their ad sales.

According to estimates from advertising measurement firm iSpot, NFL broadcasters sold more than $4.5 billion in ads during regular-season games last year alone. The absence of a season, therefore, could have dire consequences.

“While there could be nice short-term cash savings from eliminating annual rights payments, the hit to ratings, advertising and, thus, cord-cutting would be massively damaging,” Michael Nathanson, a founding partner at research firm MoffettNathanson, wrote in a note to investors earlier this year.

“We equated this trade-off to saving money on your next water bill as you watch your house burn down.”

‘Who knows what the new normal looks like?’

Football’s influence extends across a wide range of business sectors, including retail merchandise, travel, food and beverage, advertising, and, of course, gambling.

In towns like Green Bay, Wisconsin and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, a football-filled weekend is, in many ways, at the center of the local economy.

“What an Alabama game brings to Tuscaloosa, it’s in the millions of dollars for that weekend alone,” said David Carter, an associate professor of sports business at Southern California.

The loss of a fall football season could potentially have longer-term implications for businesses in those communities, as well as the primary entities at every level.

The NFL and its television partners would feel the residual effects of a lost season not just this year, but for years to come. At the college level, Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby’s worries not only about the fall, but also about the rest of the school year.

“Nobody’s given us any assurances that this is a one-year problem,” Bowlsby said. “All of our scientists and doctors are telling us that it’s going to be a bumpy road in the next 12 months – that the virus is going to be with us for a period of time and we’re going to have to learn to coexist. And so, you know, who knows what the new normal looks like?”

The NCAA and its member schools also remain under pressure from antitrust lawsuits pertaining to compensation limits for athletes. In addition, they are trying to figure out – and bargain with state lawmakers and Congress about – rules changes regarding athletes’ ability to make money from their name, images and likeness.

A fall without football could give university administrators a preview of how their sports program fare when they simply cannot spend as much as they have in recent years.

“I think what’s going to happen is that athletic directors and college presidents are going to realize that there’s a lot of fat in these programs,” Zimbalist said. “There’s a lot of waste. And they’re going to try to clean it up. … So I do think that (this) could accelerate some of the changes that were in the pipeline anyways.”

usatoday.com  

__________

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John Weld
Admin
Diamond Member
July 24, 2020 5:42 pm

Latest Covid-19 Test results: 437 athletes have been test and 7 athletes tested positive which means no new positive tests this week.

ATL D.D.S.
Diamond Member
July 24, 2020 10:35 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Egghead professors—who could not get a job in the real world outside of starbucks or the local library—always resentful of jocks, especially jocks that have a brain. Yes, there are more of those than you would think.

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 23, 2020 11:23 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Allen, I’ve seen his video — he looks just OK, certainly not a player comparable too his dad.

I’ll never understand why a slightly better than average player signs with a school that his father was all-world at when he played there. Do you remember the pressure that was on OJ’s son Jason? He couldn’t handle the anticipated comparisons and dropped out.

Anyway, that just my opinion FWIW. 👎

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 23, 2020 5:30 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

USC is no longer a respected linemen-TE program. I have never seen so many 3-star linemen being recruited to USC like the past 4-years.When is someone in the football program going to get a clue if you are going to schedule the Alabamas, Notre Dames & Texas’ as well as win championships, you can’t recruit 3-star linemen and get away with it, as well as hire suspect line-position coaches? We just keep going around in circles over this fallacy.

gametv
Active Member
July 24, 2020 10:01 am
Reply to  Jamaica

Jamaica – although Graham Harrell was a step forward from the previous offense, the core problem has not been solved. At North Texas, Harrell was coaching under Seth Latrell and his offensive ideas were challenged by a talented head coach. Harrell has said as much in interviews. At SC Helton is not really allowed to have much input into the Harrell “air raid”. And without a more experienced mentor to help Harrell develop into a really good OC at the level of SC, we get an offense that is really good at what Harrell is good at – QB and… Read more »

HOF19
Noble Member
July 23, 2020 10:37 am

Excerpt from a Article on NBCSPORTS.COM dated today 12:12 EDT about this up-and-coming season ……….”And what will the schedule look like when it is unveiled? Again per Wilner, the Pac-12 is expected to go with a 10-game schedule, with each team playing its division opponents and five crossover games. As a backup plan, a nine-game schedule will be worked up as well. Instead of Sept. 5, the 2020 season would begin Sept. 19. There are at least two bye weekends built-in, in case pandemic-related issues force the postponement of any contests. Additionally, three dates are under consideration for the conference’s championship game: the original… Read more »

Last edited 18 days ago by HOF19
rleeholder1
Noble Member
July 23, 2020 9:23 am

Whenever I read an article about financial issues at USC, I put it in perspective by reading the most recent Audited Financial Statements. Revenue generated by the Athletic Department is included in the Financial Statement Line Item “Auxiliary Services Revenue”. For the fiscal year ended June 30,2019, Auxiliary Services Revenue was $372 Million out of Total Revenues of $5.1 Billion. That’s 7.3%. Per the notes to the Audited Statements Auxiliary enterprise revenue represents “multiple revenue streams include point of sale transactions from hospitality, food, beverage, bookstore transactions, transportation and revenue generated from athletics.” The Total NET Assets of USC at… Read more »

rleeholder1
Noble Member
July 24, 2020 6:44 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Thanks Allen. All of the financial info is public and available online. Let’s hope there is a football season this year, even if it is just conference games.

gametv
Active Member
July 22, 2020 2:16 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

There are three parts of Helton’s culture that are bankrupt. First, Helton fills his staff with syncophants, his trusted buddies, despite any evidence of competence at their jobs. This was the largest problem for the team in the past. Bohn has forced some changes, but there might be more problems to overcome. Second, Helton is satisfied with mediocrity. His philosophy is faith, family, football, where faith and family are higher than football. What this means is that he does not prioritize competition or excellence. For him, there are more important things in life. That might be true, but it does… Read more »

gametv
Active Member
July 22, 2020 4:25 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I must admit that I careen back and forth between new optimism at the changes, and still seeing some big issues that need to be addressed. To me, Orlando is a huge question mark based on his previous track record. He has had some great defenses, and then some pretty horrible ones. And the thing that concerns me most is that his defenses seem to regress over time. Good coaching improves performance over time. But the position coaches under him are top grade in my book, so I give him full benefit of the doubt. Harrell is also a concern… Read more »

Steveg
Mt Rushmore
July 22, 2020 5:24 pm
Reply to  gametv

I tend to stand back and take a while to see what a coach produces. Orlando’s history at Texas may have underlying reasons, we shall see. Harrell is a breath of fresh air from the gumbo offense, likewise Orlando without much effort is going to be an improvement for the defense. We shall see, hopefully we have a season.

Steveg
Mt Rushmore
July 22, 2020 5:16 pm
Reply to  gametv

Problem with CH’s philosophy is that according to his faith, he is go run the race to win, to be and build others to be the very best they can be, and to go the second mile in all he does. In this regard he is not fully living according to his faith. Anyone can be mediocre, but a Christian man needs to do all the things that shows the fruit of his faith. This has been the thing that bothers me the most about CH.

Last edited 19 days ago by Steveg
TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 23, 2020 8:12 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Really interesting. SC will be a test to see if it is correct on the collegiate level. Bohn is attempting to create a culture in spite of the head coach rather than based upon him. I agree totally that this staff is so far superior to the 2018 staff that the two cannot be compared; all we have from the 2018 are Helton and Drevno.

gametv
Active Member
July 22, 2020 2:22 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

There is nothing really mysterious here. He is a completely selfish guy who cannot be trusted. He got his degrees for free, with minimal football and then left the team once he was actually ready to get to work. I think he is probably immensely talented and probably realized that Harrell’s offense will not maximize his personal statistics. But given the fact that he had received a free ride for all those years, he really owed it to this team to stick with them. Guy is a selfish bum. I dont blame players for transferring when it serves them, but… Read more »

Steveg
Mt Rushmore
July 22, 2020 5:26 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Daniel’s contributions were minimal. The fact he is going to leave is the same as if he was here, he would be on the sideline injured anyway. It opens a slot for someone to produce.

Steveg
Mt Rushmore
July 21, 2020 5:56 pm

This age group with covid 19 has a .04% (four one hundreths of one percent) infection rate. Now there are no stats for college football players, but assume they are in prime condition, monitored daily, and able to live in a bubble, how can football not be played. The nfl can go rot, but college ball should be played. Especially the USC/Notre Dame game. That number comes from the CDC, today.

Bobbo
Diamond Member
July 25, 2020 8:59 am
Reply to  Steveg

My thoughts exactly SteveG. Perfectly stated. Under 25 yr olds (as a group) have less chance of dying from Covid than the flu or pneumonia. This is so similar to what our mom’s did when we were young. If a kid on your street got Chicken Pox, then all the mom’s got the kids together and play. Why? So you could get it over with as a child and get on with your life. Plus, it was easier as a kid. So much for the pearl clutching society we have now.

Golden Trojan
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 3:53 pm

The theory above assumes people will just burn the money they would have spent on football. Not so. Advertisers will look to other ways to market their products, think of the cost savings not running a Super Bowl commercial. Fans will spend their money elsewhere. No football, other live entertainment, restaurants, bars, gyms? People will spend that money on home improvements, new car, pay down debt, home gym, new bicycle, on and on. I can’t go to a store so I buy on line. If your business is directly or indirectly related to any of the activities that are shut,… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Golden Trojan
RialtoTrojan
Noble Member
July 21, 2020 3:30 pm

One thought I have heard is there is an attempt to ween people away from American football. This is due to the injury and lasting effects the game has on the players. The idea is that the masses will soon forget about football all together and enjoy safer sports . I know I will not be happy until real football is returned to the schools, but I don’t know how the average college freshman feels about football in this day and age.

TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:19 pm
Reply to  RialtoTrojan

I think it depends on the location. In the Northeast (which is our present President ideal) football in on a par with lacrosse or hockey. In the South and Midwest, it is the center of the culture. In the West, as Allen has noted, it is dying. I think this is due to immigration (both legal and illegal) and political changes. Asians and south Asians (Indians from India) do not play football (legal immigrants) and Mexicans and Central Americans (illegal) play soccer and not football; and progressives (who control the government and the media) wish to remove it for ideological… Read more »

ATL D.D.S.
Diamond Member
July 22, 2020 6:38 am
Reply to  TrojanRJJ

I agree with you RJJ, but many would call us paranoid racists. Some probably here on TDB. Whatever.

Bobbo
Diamond Member
July 25, 2020 9:11 am
Reply to  TrojanRJJ

Disclaimer: My son was a scholarship athlete in Lacrosse. I was a football and baseball guy into college. It hurt more than a little when he gave up baseball in 9th grade. But since both are spring sports one had to go. Baseball was just too slow paced for him and he was always known as a hitter (he put out 4 kids in the Trinity League Jr. Varsity games his sophomore yearl with hits). I must say, lacrosse has become my favorite sport (with the exception of SC football specifically). It has everything. Continuous action of basketball, eye/hand coordination… Read more »

John Weld
Admin
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 3:03 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Two months ago I would have agreed with you but since the political and cultural revolution began you are witnessing idealogies, that were unthinkable two months ago, being considered and many put into action. Would she eliminate football, probably not, would she attempt to diminish or marginalize it, I think the answer is yes.

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 21, 2020 7:01 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Well she threw out all the clubs & fraternities and I don’t see any protest going on outside campus or at least calls for her resignation. She is weeding out any historical connections “she” feels is racist. I haven’t heard anyone screaming about alums like john Wayne’s likeness being banished due to his patriotic stances in the movies and supporting the Constituion at public appearances. I have always looked at USC as an institution of reasonable balanced thinking with an “even keel” attitude and not of a runaway train of leftist thinking. There’s already enough of them around anyway….

ATL D.D.S.
Diamond Member
July 22, 2020 6:41 am
Reply to  Jamaica

Has Folt banished the Fraternities? I hadn’t heard that, but if she did it I would not be surprised.

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 5:15 pm
Reply to  John Weld

Exactly John — things/priorities have changed in a major way and only time will tell if we will ever get back to sanity. JMHO 😟

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:19 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Point taken Allen. Remember when we played the best teams and feared nothing? I want that swagger back. 😎

TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:24 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Allen, it is obvious that Bohn does not want to be the person remembered for destroying SC football. It is also obvious Folt/Caruso will support him (for the present) for income reasons. I wish him well.

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 21, 2020 7:17 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

As long as she has the BOTs (Caruso & Nikias) behind her, and the combined faculty doesn’t vote no confidence in her leadership, who is going to stop her? It would take a huge student revolt to get enough attention to get a possible resignation and I don’t see that happening. Besides, business-research Grant money & tuition are what funds major Universities mainly. USC has the largest ratio of Asian student population that basically pays its own way. And maybe Max Nikias is still at it behind the scenes finding huge monetary resources for the school to carry it on.… Read more »

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 21, 2020 7:48 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

You ask good questions Allen as always. My post just said I believe USC could get away with de-emphasizing football and survive financially with the money sources I mentioned. What concerns me is there is little protest if any as to what has gone on since Folt took over. You answered the question about the coliseum with renting-leasing-concerts and all. They would certainly lose the naming rights money, maybe have to eat the money paid to update and offer it back to the State. I hope this never happens….

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 24, 2020 9:02 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

When you asked about schools willfully de-emphasizing their football program I immediately thought of Pitt. How they were a power in the 40s & 50s but dropped off the map in the 60s and since with an exception of a few good years when Johnny Majors coached there and won a nattie. In de-emphasizing football at USC I could easily see the Folt administration backing away from supporting a flagship status and continue what is going on now in being just another member in the middle of the pack striving just for a winning season and be satisfied like a… Read more »

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 25, 2020 8:33 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I think I said what happened to Pitt after the 40s & 50s when they were a consistent power and dropped off the map during the next 15 plus years. They were a pretty sorry program at that time.

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 25, 2020 10:23 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

With few exceptions, what administration would ever publically admit they were de-emphasizing a football program unless it was an IVY league school? So how can anyone know for sure what goes on behind closed doors. Alabama Birmingham tried to shut down its football program but found some support to survive.

TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 22, 2020 10:32 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Allen, Great points but based on her actions, Folt has made her ideals and intent clear. What has to happen for her to be removed is a true financial melt down which is reasonably traced to her program. That is not going to happen for at least four years. I do not know how long it is going to take for football to decline, but given what we are seeing, Bohn will be allowed to attempt to protect the heritage so long as his efforts are financially successful. You were correct, I think, in stating that losing the 2020 season… Read more »

TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:10 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Allen, Open your eyes! John has nailed it. Her actions speaks much louder than her words. She is simply exploiting the symbol, not endorsing it. She wants to retain the symbols but totally change the meaning and the structure behind them. I doubt this will work, but a classic example of this tactic is the Roman Emperor Augustine. He destroyed the Republic and replaced it with one man rule, but he was able to do so by keeping all the symbols of the Republic but he totally changed the meaning of them and the structure behind them. Folt is using… Read more »

TrojanRJJ
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:30 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

For income reasons and because of Bohn. My guess is Bohn told Folt/Caruso unless major changes were made immediately, she was facing an economic disaster in 2020 in the athletic department. To continue to speculate, she/they was/were unwilling to take that large a hit so authorized the money. If SC does not play in 2020, Bohn wasted some money. And, you know my opinion of SC playing in 2020.

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 25, 2020 8:55 am
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Folt comes in, sees what Swann has done in throwing money away and replaces him with a MAC school AD. But then puts limitations on him as to what he can & can’t do in trying to resurrect the football program? Bohn has hired a block of recently fired coaches which a flagship level program would never have to do. This latest recruitment class was morbid and the OL is still very poor. You can only get a 3-star fortified USC team to improve so much especially with a big turnover of coaching staff. I don’t see how anyone can… Read more »

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 25, 2020 10:39 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I do agree with you that Bohn should quit the next time Folt/Caruso puts a roadblock on what he tries to do to upgrade the football program. Only those who have an agenda or are totally ignorant would stop halfway in fixing a faltering ship.

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 26, 2020 8:39 am
Reply to  Jamaica

I have a client/long time friend on the Board of Trustees — Folt is not a significant issue — but Caruso the “Autocrat” is.; According too my client, he’s using USC as a springboard to run for mayor or governor. FWIW

ATL D.D.S.
Diamond Member
July 26, 2020 9:40 am
Reply to  Terrific Tommy

I figured he is running for something. Mayor is small potatoes. But it won’t be Senate–he needs to be in charge. I say governor. But which party I wonder?

redondob
Active Member
July 26, 2020 2:33 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Allen, first time poster and fellow Sig. I have also been told by BOT sources that it’s all about Caruso’s political ambitions. He’s using USC to say he stood up to the old rich white guys. Originally heard he was stepping down in June, but didn’t happen. Has now run 2 full page “Dear Angelinos” ads in LA Times and is appearing on tv to air his social views. Keep an eye on him.

John Weld
Admin
Diamond Member
July 21, 2020 6:38 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

The athletic department is spending the money not the academic side of the university. Bohn is doing the best he can do under the circumstances he was given. The UC Davis cancellation was a result of Bohn trying to win over the alumni after he decided to pass on a decision on Clay.

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 21, 2020 7:35 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I may be exaggerating some, but close to half of the football staff here were fired from their last job. Orlando and his followers were let go at Texas, Drevno was fired at Michigan, Mike Jinks was fired at Bowling Green, the coaches GH have brought with him have little experience (one or two were grad assistants) Snyder & Nansen may have left their previous jobs and Colbert is legit. With Helton, do you really feel this USC staff is that tops?

gametv
Active Member
July 25, 2020 2:05 pm
Reply to  Jamaica

Jamaica – I think that there are two ways to look at the coaching staff. One way is to look at them compared with the prior coaching staff. I do think that Orlando is an upgrade from Pendergast. Orlando will bring in some physical practices. He has hired 3 coaches and two of those coaches – So’Oto and Williams are top notch and did not get fired from previous jobs. They are young, but considered rising stars. Orlando himself is a bit of a question mark, as he has had up years and down years. On the offensive side of… Read more »

Jamaica
Knighted Member
July 26, 2020 3:23 pm
Reply to  gametv

Some of what you say makes sense, gametv, especially about the limit of quality coaches willing to come as long as Helton is HC. But I think it is a little more of what is & has happened to the USC football program, administrative-wise since PC left, has made a negative impression on the best in the coaching-recruiting business that this program is no longer being supported to win championships.

gametv
Active Member
July 26, 2020 5:01 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I really dont think it is difficult at SC. Hire a really good coach and let him build a program similar to Bama or Clemson or LSU. USC has massive recruiting advantages. It might take 2-3 years to stock up the roster with superior talent and get them to play as a team. There are only a couple programs in the country that can compete with SC for recruits, if SC’s head coach and record are considered competitive for a CFP berth. In my opinion, the difference between great programs and all the rest is simply that the great head… Read more »

gametv
Active Member
July 27, 2020 5:29 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

The thing I like about Fickell is that his teams get better over the years. The first year under Fickell UC was 4-8, but then the next year it went 11-2 and then 11-3. To me, the sign of a great head coach is that over a given period of time, the team improves. I dont think you can hold the limited time as HC at Ohio State against him. To me, that is the difference between a coach who is maybe great at play calling and a HC who is great at building a program. The great play caller… Read more »

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 26, 2020 7:40 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I feel the same Allen — as long as the Administration and the BOT let him do the job — which obviously would include a realistic budget. 🙏

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 25, 2020 12:01 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

Yes, she does Allen. But speaking only for myself, when she does that and talks about USC in the way she typically does, it comes off contrived and as a result, phony. And that insincerity has always turned me off Allen. JMHO 👎

Terrific Tommy
Diamond Member
July 25, 2020 7:46 pm
Reply to  Allen Wallace

I understood that Allen — I was merely adding that she comes off phony when she does that — which could very well be unfair to her on my part. 😕