Carson Palmer Scouts Josh Rosen - Archive

Jess Root (Cards Wire)  —  Since the start of OTAs, when it comes to rookie quarterback Josh Rosen, the buzz has ranged from simply positive to gushing. There is a lot to like.

Arizona Cardinals quarterback Carson Palmer (3) throws against the San Diego Chargers during the first half of a preseason NFL football game, Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)

The Cardinals’ last starting quarterback, Carson Palmer, gave his thoughts on the rookie, appearing on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM Wednesday. His scouting report on Rosen is all positive, but comes with a caveat.

“First off, I judge it with a grain of salt,” he said. “Until you start getting hit in the mouth, you just don’t know how good a player can be.” So all the rave reviews coming from Cardinals OTAs are good, but nothing to get too excited about yet. Rosen has to get into games and do it. That said, Palmer loves Rosen’s game.

“I had more fun watching Josh’s film than probably any quarterback in the last decade.”

Palmer called Rosen’s film “phenomenal.”

“I don’t see a big dropoff in his success on the field in the NFL.”

So what did Palmer see in Rosen’s play at UCLA?

“I saw great accuracy. I saw a lot of zip and velocity on the ball. I saw him make difficult, challenging throws all over the field and down-the-field accuracy. He threw with great anticipation and great timing.”

Palmer also pointed out the talent around him at UCLA wasn’t elite.

“There weren’t a ton of NFL guys on his team,” he said. “It’s not like he was throwing to second-and-third-round picks at receiver. He was doing it with a bunch of different guys, a couple of different tight ends and playing against NFL talent without a lot of NFL talent on his side.”

Palmer said Rosen’s ability to make throws before receivers are open and to do it accurately “is something you just don’t see, especially in today’s day and age.”

What will be Rosen’s challenge?

It won’t be the mental side. It won’t be the offense or seeing what the defense is giving him.

“You’ve got to be able to stand there in the pocket, get hit in the face and throw the football down the field,” he said. “His game is not outside the pocket. His game is not running for eight yards on third-and-seven. His game is standing in the pocket, taking hits, throwing the ball vertically, throwing the ball in holes down the sideline. . . but doing that when there’s 260 pounds coming downhill at your face is a whole different world, a whole different animal.”

Cards Wire